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By Kevin F. Kern

Ohio: A heritage of the Buckeye State explores the breadth of Ohio’s prior, tracing the process background from its earliest geological classes to the current day in an available, single-volume format.

  • Features the main updated examine on Ohio, drawing on fabric within the disciplines of background, archaeology, and political science
  • Includes thematic chapters concentrating on significant social, fiscal, and political trends
  • Amply illustrated with maps, drawings, and photographs

Receipient of the Ohio Geneological Society's Henry Howe Award in 2014

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Ohio: A History of the Buckeye State

Ohio: A heritage of the Buckeye country explores the breadth of Ohio’s earlier, tracing the process historical past from its earliest geological classes to the current day in an available, single-volume structure. positive aspects the main updated learn on Ohio, drawing on fabric within the disciplines of heritage, archaeology, and political scienceIncludes thematic chapters concentrating on significant social, financial, and political trendsAmply illustrated with maps, drawings, and photographsReceipient of the Ohio Geneological Society's Henry Howe Award in 2014

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Extra info for Ohio: A History of the Buckeye State

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Among the most noticeable of these were an ever-�increasing variety of projectile points. Whereas Paleo-Indian spear tips fell along a relatively narrow continuum of types and styles, Early Archaic points (in what is now the Eastern United States) became increasingly diverse. In Ohio, these styles tended to fall into two major complexes: the Kirk/Palmer tradition, which are scattered throughout the state but also to the south and east, and those of the Thebes tradition, which are much rarer but found in a larger area including Indiana and Illinois.

Kent: Kent State University Press). 2 The First Ohioans Prehistoric Ohio In early 1772, Moravian missionary David Zeisberger made his way through the Ohio wilderness to found the first of three towns for Christianized members of the Lenape (or Delaware) tribe along the Muskingum River. Recording his trip in his daily journal he became the first known person to write an eyewitness account of Ohio’s ancient earthworks: Long ago, perhaps more than a century ago, Indians must have lived here who fortified themselves against the attacks of their enemies.

The whole town must have been fortified, but the site is now covered with a thick wood. No one knows to what nation these Indians belonged. It is plain, however, that they were a warlike race. Zeisberger should be forgiven for misunderstanding the nature and significance of what he saw. After all, no one then alive could have told him that the earthworks he described were at least a thousand years older than he imagined and had not been used as forts. At least he was correct in one important particular: Indians built these earthworks.

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